Public Accountability Data 2012-2013

Retention and Graduation Data

In August 2013, the Richard T. Robertson School of Media and Culture was among 111 programs at colleges and universities in the United States and abroad accredited by the Accrediting Council on Education in Journalism and Mass Communications. The ACEJMC requires accredited programs to post their retention and graduation data. Virginia Commonwealth University's Office of Planning and Decision Support provided these statistics [the link will open in a new window, because the chart is very wide] for the Robertson School. The data track each first-year (freshman) class of mass communications majors. The statistics show the percentage of students who continue in mass communications each year and then graduate within four, five or six years.

Here is another way to present the data, by focusing on each first-year class one at a time:

Fall 2005: First-Time Full-Time Mass Communications Majors

Original cohort

164

Changed majors (any time after their first semester)

55 (33.5%)

Retained 1 year

64.0%

Retained 2 years

44.5%

Retained 3 years

39.0%

Graduated in 4 years or less

20.1%

Graduated in 5 years or less

28.7%

Graduated in 6 years or less

29.3%

 

Fall 2006: First-Time Full-Time Mass Communications Majors

Original cohort

153

Changed majors (any time after their first semester)

38 (24.8%)

Retained 1 year

80.4%

Retained 2 years

60.1%

Retained 3 years

53.6%

Graduated in 4 years or less

35.9%

Graduated in 5 years or less

40.5%

Graduated in 6 years or less

43.8%

 

Fall 2007: First-Time Full-Time Mass Communications Majors

Original cohort

161

Changed majors (any time after their first semester)

50 (31.1%)

Retained 1 year

72.7%

Retained 2 years

54.0%

Retained 3 years

51.6%

Graduated in 4 years or less

29.8%

Graduated in 5 years or less

36.6%

Graduated in 6 years or less

--

 

Fall 2008: First-Time Full-Time Mass Communications Majors

Original cohort

180

Changed majors (any time after their first semester)

57 (31.8%)

Retained 1 year

67.0%

Retained 2 years

50.3%

Retained 3 years

44.1%

Graduated in 4 years or less

27.4%

Graduated in 5 years or less

--

Graduated in 6 years or less

--

 

Fall 2009: First-Time Full-Time Mass Communications Majors

Original cohort

157

Changed majors (any time after their first semester)

41 (26.1%)

Retained 1 year

74.5%

Retained 2 years

63.1%

Retained 3 years

56.1%

Graduated in 4 years or less

--

Graduated in 5 years or less

--

Graduated in 6 years or less

--

 

Fall 2010: First-Time Full-Time Mass Communications Majors

Original cohort

127

Changed majors (any time after their first semester)

30 (23.6%)

Retained 1 year

68.5%

Retained 2 years

55.1%

Retained 3 years

--

Graduated in 4 years or less

--

Graduated in 5 years or less

--

Graduated in 6 years or less

--

 

Fall 2011: First-Time Full-Time Mass Communications Majors

Original cohort

136

Changed majors (any time after their first semester)

14 (10.3%)

Retained 1 year

73.5%

Retained 2 years

--

Retained 3 years

--

Graduated in 4 years or less

--

Graduated in 5 years or less

--

Graduated in 6 years or less

--

 

One wrinkle in the reporting method used in the statistics above is how it treats first-year students who start in mass comm but then change majors. The graduation rates above reflect the fact that these students do not graduate as mass comm majors -- which is true. However, many if not most of these students do graduate from VCU, but in another discipline. Our reported graduation rates would be much higher if we tracked only students who start and stay as mass comm majors. According to the above data, 115 first-year students entered the mass comm major in Fall 2006 and remained in that major during their time at VCU. Fifty-eight percent of them graduated within six years -- which is about the same as VCU's six-year graduation rate.

Another wrinkle is that the data do not include students who enter The Robertson School after their first year from other VCU majors or from other universities. The Robertson School serves hundreds of such students. This is why the number of bachelor's degrees we award each year far exceeds the number of first-year students majoring in mass comm:

Academic year

2007-08

2008-09

2009-10

2010-11

2011-12

2012-13

Bachelor's degrees awarded

197

207

219

253

234

230*

* Not including Summer 2013

The number of mass comm majors at VCU has increased in recent years:

 

Fall 2007

Fall 2008

Fall 2009

Fall 2010

Fall 2011

Fall 2012

First-year mass comm majors

161

180

157

127

136

118

Transfer students enrolled in mass comm

93

102

110

106

129

116

Total undergraduate enrollment

1,071

1,199

1,232

1,196

1,226

1,260

 

In addition, The Robertson School serves more than 100 undergraduates pursuing a minor in media studies. Moreover, the school's faculty also serves students in two master's programs (Strategic Public Relations and Multimedia Journalism) and an interdisciplinary doctoral program (Media, Art and Text).

All of the above data come from VCU's Office of Planning and Decision Support (OPDS). Here is a chart with a more detailed breakdown of the numbers.

Besides requiring the publication of retention and graduation data, the Accrediting Council for Education in Journalism and Mass Communications suggested that accredited schools provide the public with additional indicators of student achievement.

Internship supervisor surveys

VCU mass communications majors are required to complete an internship in which they work closely with media professionals. Between Fall 2012 and Summer 2013, about 230 students enrolled in our MASC 493 Fieldwork/Internship course. At the end of the internship, the supervisor at the work site must evaluate the student's performance. Here is a summary of the supervisor evaluations for 2012-13.

1

2

3

4

5

Rate the ability of the intern to work well with others in the workplace. Rate the student on a scale of 5 to 1. Five means the intern works exceptionally well with others, and 1 means the intern works poorly with others.

0%

2%

6%

24%

67%

Rate the intern’s diligence in completing tasks on a 5 to 1 scale. Five means the intern demonstrates great diligence, and 1 means the intern shows little or no diligence in completing tasks.

0%

5%

15%

28%

52%

Rate the intern’s ability to make sound judgments on a scale of 5 to 1. Five means the intern demonstrates excellent judgment, and 1 means the intern shows poor judgment.

1%

5%

16%

32%

46%

Rate the intern’s dependability in terms of attendance, meeting deadlines and punctuality, on a 1 to 5 scale. Five means very dependable, and 1 means very undependable.

0%

5%

12%

29%

52%

Rate the intern’s ability to learn the tasks that he or she was assigned. Five means the intern learned exceptionally quick, and 1 means the intern learned very slowly.

0%

4%

14%

40%

39%

How much has the intern learned during the internship? Five means an exceptional amount, and 1 means very little.

1%

0%

18%

47%

33%

Overall, how would you rate the intern’s performance? Five means exceptionally good, and 1 means very poor.

0%

2%

9%

34%

54%

Note: The numbers may not total 100% because of rounding and skipped responses.

Also as part of the survey, supervisors were asked, "If funding were available, would you hire this intern?" Seventy-six percent of the supervisors said yes; 12 percent said no; and the others did not respond to that question.

Student awards

Over the past five years, students in The Robertson School have won more than 250 international, national, regional and other awards. They include awards in advertisingjournalism and public relations.

Job placement data

The State Council of Higher Education for Virginia recently started tracking what happens to college students after they graduate. SCHEV acknowledges that its system is limited: It tracks only college graduates who find work in Virginia, for example. (Many of our graduates go to work for advertising agencies, news organizations and public relations firms out of state.) Moreover, the system may not capture graduates who are working as independent contractors, such as freelance journalists. Furthermore, SCHEV notes, "Wage outcomes of graduates do not measure the quality or effectiveness of any institution. Instead, they provide basic facts about the experiences of graduates after entering the workforce and indications as to broadest levels of outcome in the Commonwealth -- full-time employment, part-time enrollment, and enrollment in higher-level programs."

With those caveats, here are SCHEV's statistics comparing VCU mass comm graduates with all other VCU graduates, and with mass comm graduates from all Virginia colleges and universities. These numbers include only graduates who received bachelor's degrees between 2006 and 2010. (The statistics reflect what the graduates were doing 18 months after earning their degrees.)

 

Total graduates

Employed full-time in Virginia

Attending graduate school

Employed part-time in Virginia

No information

Average salary

VCU Roberston School

980

53%

9%

15%

23%

$28,388

All VCU graduates

17,770

50%

12%

14%

24%

$34,677

Mass comm graduates from all Virginia institutions

1,430

49%

8%

15%

28%

$27,574

This page was originally published on Sept. 1, 2013.